Voter Registration

Register to Vote

Washington State Elections offers multiple ways to register. Before you register to vote, view voter eligibility and dates and deadlines.

Cancel my voter registration - To cancel your voter registration, print a cancellation form and return it to:

Chelan County Elections Office
350 Orondo Ave, Ste 306, Level 3
Wenatchee, WA 98801

You can also contact our office for assistance at (509) 667-6808.

Report a deceased voter - To notify our office of a deceased voter, please complete a notice of deceased voter form and mail it to:

Chelan County Elections Office
350 Orondo Ave, Ste 306, Level 3
Wenatchee, WA 98801

The notice must be signed by a registered voter. 

Voters Eligibility

Washington State encourages every eligible person to register to vote and participate fully in all elections. Each of us is responsible for protecting the integrity of the electoral process by providing equal access, and guarding against fraud and discrimination.

To register to vote, you must be:

  • A citizen of the United States;
  • A legal resident of Washington State;
  • At least 18 years old by Election Day;
  • Not disqualified from voting due to a court order; and
  • Not under Department of Corrections supervision for a Washington felony conviction.

Citizenship

You must be a citizen of the United States. If you have questions about citizenship, contact U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

Residency Requirements

To register to vote in Washington State, you must be a resident of the state. Your voting residence is your permanent address or a transitional address where you physically reside.

You must establish your voting residency address at least 30 days before Election Day. You may specify a mailing address that is different from your residential address.

Voting in two places is a felony

You may only be registered to vote at one location, even if you own multiple residences. If you move or are temporarily away, you may maintain your voter registration at that address until you register to vote elsewhere.

You may only vote once; you may only vote in one county in one state. Keep this in mind when deciding if you want to list your home or school address for your voter registration. Should you accidentally receive two ballots, vote only once.

If you have a nontraditional address, such as a motor home or transitional housing, your voting residence is the physical location at the time you register to vote. You may list a different address for your mailing address.

If you are a United States citizen living abroad, you may use your last Washington address. If you have never lived in the country, you may use the last address of your parents or other family member.

Even if you are living outside of Washington State, you will retain your residency if you are:

  • employees in the civil or military service of the state or of the United States;
  • living overseas;
  • attending college or any institution of learning; or
  • confined in any public prison.

You may maintain your voter registration in Washington State until you register to vote elsewhere.

For more information about voting residence, see Article VI, Sections 1 and 4 of the Washington State Constitution, RCW 29A.04.151, and RCW 29A.08.112.

To challenge a voter registration, you must file a Voter Challenge Form with the county elections department where that person is registered.

Felons and voting rights RCW 29A.08.520

If you were convicted of a felony in a Washington State court,  your right to vote is restored automatically once you are no longer under the authority of Department of Corrections (DOC) (in prison or on community custody). If you have questions about your status with DOC, you can call (800) 430-9674.

If you were convicted of a felony in another state or in a federal court, your right to vote is restored as long as you are not currently incarcerated for that felony. 

  • You do not lose the right to vote for a misdemeanor conviction or a conviction in juvenile court.
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  • You do not need a certificate of discharge (COD) to have your voting rights restored.

Fines, restitution, or other legal financial obligations (LFOs)

You are not required to completely pay off your fines, restitution, or other legal financial obligations (LFOs) before you register to vote. However, your voting rights can be revoked if the sentencing court determines that you have failed to comply with the terms of your legal financial obligations.

Under Department of Corrections Authority

Only people in jail, prison, or on community custody under Department of Corrections (DOC) authority for a felony conviction are not eligible to vote. If you are unsure if you are under the DOC authority for a Washington State felony conviction, call at (800) 430-9674.

Registering to Vote?

Once your right to vote is restored, you must register to vote if you want to vote. If you were previously registered to vote, you must re-register to vote. You can register online with MyVote, printing and returning a form, in a person at your county elections department or request a voter registration form be mailed to you. You do not need a certificate of discharge (COD) to register to vote. You must also be a citizen of the United States, legal resident of Washington State, 18 years old, not under authority of the DOC, and not disqualified due to a court order. See voter eligibility information above on this page.

Mental competency and voting rights

Only a Superior Court can declare a person unable to vote due to mental incompetency and therefore unable to vote. Do not assume that a person under a guardianship due to their mental capacity is ineligible to vote.

A guardian may not vote on behalf of a person under guardianship, and power of attorney does not extend to voting.

Whether a person under guardianship may vote depends on when the guardianship was imposed and whether the guardianship is full or partial.

  • If full guardianship was imposed before July 24, 2005, the person is not eligible to vote unless the court order specifically states otherwise.
  • If partial guardianship was imposed before July 24, 2005, the person retains the right to vote unless the court order specifically states otherwise.
  • If full or partial guardianship was imposed on or after July 24, 2005, the person retains the right to vote unless the court order specifically states otherwise.

For more information, see Article VI, Section 3 of the Washington State Constitution, RCW 11.88.010(5), or Washington Law Help.

Voter Concern Form

If you have witnessed, or been a victim of, fraud or discrimination you may submit a Voter Concern Form.

DO NOT

  • Submit false information on a voter registration application;
  • Register in more than one location; or
  • Accept payment, or offer to pay another, to register to vote.