Mission Statement

To promote and enhance public safety and to ensure victim's rights, by enforcing court ordered sanctions and facilitating positive behavioral changes in offenders through a balance of treatment and enforcement strategies.

District Court Probation

District Court Probation receives referrals for supervision from Chelan County District Court.  The referrals require offender supervision for a wide variety of criminal charges such as:

  • Domestic Violence
  • Driving Under the Influence
  • Misdemeanor Theft
  • Misdemeanor Drug Offenses
  • Assault and Assault Domestic Violence
  • Misdemeanor Sex Offenses

Probation is a privilege, granted by court order, that allows an offender to remain in the community under the supervision of a probation officer.

In most cases, Probation Officers work together with counselors from many professional disciplines incuding alcohol and drug treatment, domestic violence treatment and mental health professionals to create opportunities for offenders to make positive behavioral changes and maintain compliance with the Court's orders.  

Some sentences do not require the offender to report in person to our office.  Instead, we monitor them through record checks and sometimes, mail-in reporting.  These type of cases are often called "Bench Supervision" or "Informal probation."

Other activities for which we provide supervision or compliance monitoring include work crew, community service hours and collecting restitution debts on behalf of the victims.  

Ours is truly a case-by-case business and the specifics of your own supervision will depend largely on your sentence and your attitude toward the orders you receive.


A bit of history about our profession....

John Augustus

John Augustus

In 1841, John Augustus attended police court to bail out a "common drunkard," the first probationer. The offender was ordered to appear in court three weeks later for sentencing. He returned to court a sober man, accompanied by Augustus. To the astonishment of all in attendance, his appearance and demeanor had dramatically changed.

Augustus thus began an 18-year career as a volunteer probation officer. Not all of the offenders helped by Augustus were alcohol abusers, nor were all prospective probationers taken under his wing. Close attention was paid to evaluating whether or not a candidate would likely prove to be a successful subject for probation. The offender's character, age, and the people, places, and things apt to influence him or her were all considered.

Augustus was subsequently credited with founding the investigations process, one of three main concepts of modern probation, the other two being intake and supervision. Augustus, who kept detailed notes on his activities, was also the first to apply the term "probation" to his method of treating offenders.

Schmalleger, Frank and Smykla, John O. (2013). Corrections in the 21st Century. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Companies.